How to Rock Your Home: Marble, Granite and Quartz

If you’re confused on what’s the difference between marble, granite and quartz, don’t worry, you aren’t the only one who’s not sure what the fuss is all about. While there are many different types of finishes and even different stone options to choose from, its usually down to one of these three choices. So, if you’re deciding between these three choices for your home, we’ve broken the down the difference between these common selections and worked out how you can decide which one is the right choice for you.

Quartz

Starting off, let’s have a look at quartz. Quartz is different from the other two choices because it’s the only one which is contains synthetic elements. Instead of being dug up from the ground and turned into your newest countertop, quartz is produced by mixing crushed quartz with resins and pigments before being left to set into the desired shape and size.

Because of these additional steps, quartz is probably the most varied stone of the three, coming in with vibrant and bright colours with colour enhancements, and can even be made to resemble granite and marble. However, this stone will usually come with a uniform and standard pattern, since it is usually mass produced, and will not have any of the usual lines and grains you see in the other two rocks.

Quartz is also the hardiest among the three choices as its production process usually includes the addition of resins which helps to strengthen the material. The process also allows the surface to remain dense and non-porous throughout its lifespan, needing little to no maintenance throughout its lifespan.

Granite

Another solid, durable and stain resistant material, granite is a popular choice for floors and counter tops. Coming in a variety of natural colours from brown, to grey to black, granite is the more varied than marble and this is one of its more appealing factors. The surface can take a lot of abuse, standing up well against strong cleaning agents and stains, so you won’t have to specially look out for granite specific cleaners when using this. The unique patterns and grains won’t fade away over time either, so with the proper upkeep, your home will look exactly the same as day one.

While the rock is strong and highly heat resistant, you may have to do some touch up after a few years. The finish on the surface keeps the top non-porous, however over time this will be stripped away with usual wear and tear, so be prepared to have a little upkeeping with sealants.

Its not uncommon to go for non-glossy options for granite too. If you’re using it for outdoors, unpolished granite will be a great choice given its durability and earthy tones. Indoors, unpolished granite tiles give a better grip and can feel less cold at night too.

Marble

If you were inspired by some of the greatest architectural marvels around the world, it’s no surprise that you would be interested in adorning your own home with the same material as the Taj Mahal. Having luxurious marble pave the very floor of your home is more than just a statement, it’s a lifestyle. As the most recognizable choice of the three, the distinctive pattern and quality of marble can be distinguished from miles away, with some of the most alluring patterns and veins which flow throughout each slab.

But with such a luxurious material comes the price. In addition to being the most expensive choice among the three, marble is also requires the most maintenance. While you may think the stone is rock hard, in actual fact, marble is the softest among the choices. Natural marble will readily absorb water and chemicals and quickly become discoloured and damaged. So, to prevent this, the marble you’re more familiar with has to undergo specific treatments and preparations to make it suitable for your home. This means regular sealing, proper (and possibly professional) cleaning with specific chemicals and if you don’t comply to these strict guidelines, the tiles will start to stain and chip easily.

While you may want to jump at the opportunity to plaster your home with marble from floor to ceiling, its probably the most problematic of the three, and will definitely end up costing the most with how high maintenance it is.